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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 309 (some duplicates have been removed)
happened in katrina. nbc's katy tur is with us from the hard hit jersey shore tonight. katy, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. that is certainly the big question, up and down the new jersey shore, the aftereffects of sandy are still being felt. we're on long beach island. it's a barrier island, it's literally where the atlantic ocean meets the bay. and here, dozens of homes still look like this, their bottom floors completely washed away when the powerful storm surge came through. the last time kyle burns house looked like this was 1950, the year it was built. >> bed, couches, chairs, everything was just floating around. it was a mess. >> reporter: two feet of rushing water and sand soaked this third generation family beach home. with gas lines restored, the people of colgate on lbi are finally allowed to come back. >> they're old. '78. >> reporter: as residents count their personal losses, state officials are looking at the big numbers. >> when you look at the damage done because of the density of new york, the number of people affected, the number of properties affected wa
plan. >> excellence. >> well executed. >> i thank you. >> a lot of criticism of fema back in katrina. today we hear nothing but good about fema. >> i thank craig would lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: not so fast because all in rescueville is not so great. a lot of the folks they represent would like to kick them in the ass. this is the reality. welcome, everyone, not so happy friday. mr. president, you may want to wait on the "heck of a job" thing because rescue efforts have become heck of a joke for folks in the northeast fuming. because the help isn't coming. in gas. no power. no food. they have had it. >> restaurants and boats and homes are looted. >> the coast guard has not been here to help. >> come here and walk into the streets here. the water is this high. you have to wear the waders. >>neil: that is just on staten island. homes are swamps. motorists are stuck if -- in gas lines, four hours or more if you can find a place to fill in. two-thirds of gas stations even now in new york and new jersey remain shut down. out of juice. out of gas. thousands are fuming, out of p
's a mess and owes 18 billion dollars from hurricane katrina. i mean, this is an agency that cannot manage itself. the inspector general wrote a long report last year saying the agency is mismanaged, it doesn't have systems in place that can talk to states. they can't talk to each other, they don't have the right computers in place and let me tell you, they are managing more disasters all the time. president obama has called more disasters than any other president in the last 20 years. fema is not the organization. give it to the local states, they're the people who can make these decisions and spend the money wisely. >> neil: i don't dismiss the role of a federal presence disasters like these, but when bottled water can't arrive to a site and folks supposed to weather the storm close, at antithesis of what you're supposed to adopt and send e-mails to people who don't have powers and texts to phone to people who don't have phone service, you can't make this stuff up. >> that's the problem with bureaucracy and not letting states handle this. if anybody can more money, go out to staten islan
there is no drinking water. >> neil: you and i sxi can remember with katrina, big difference in variety of levels. it was the same immediate response that things were under control. the famous heck of a job brownie comment that prompted the initial view, things are under control and not so bad. then we started getting the images, we started seeing more and more. it was not under control. we're seeing the initial response on the part of president and governor christie and mayor bloomberg and governor of new jersey is still speaking to reporters in hoboken. residents who are affected in these areas, you are talking a good game but it ain't happening to me. that is when it turns the tide. what do you see happening now if this lingers much longer? >> reporter: first of all, thank you for covering this story. i have been watching other stations, they are not covering this station. a lot of americans saw the instant response, this was a storm that was dealt with and very professional and competent manner and fema and state. now, we are finding out thanks in large part that is not the case. i think a lo
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
their roovs two days after sandy, in scenes reminiscent of katrina. also reports of a desperate search for two children, swept away from their mom in the storm surge. and then word that the death toll had nearly doubled to 14. it was becoming clear that staten island, a sleepy enclave best known as the name sake for the famous staten island ferry, was a world away from the rest of this city which today was getting moving again. so, we hopped in the car outside of our office in manhattan, expecting a journey that would be made very difficult by the city's maddening post-storm grid lock. instead, the real problems became getting gas. we drove around northern new jersey for hours encountering lines and frustrated people. >> aggravating. that storm did its thing. knocked out everything. >> reporter: we were only saved by some relatives of one of our colleagues who brought us a two-gallon jug of gas. >> just keep it. >> reporter: it's okay. finally, we arrived. and look at what we saw next from our window. >> the transformer blew up and took the whole store down. that's my open sign to the store. i
and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a
. a housing cyclone that hollowed out more homes that hurricane katrina and sandy combined. the very definition of disaster needs broadening. we need to recapture the initial horror created by those single natural disaster and put it toward the relief of our on going national disasters. the energy gathered by gale force winds has the power to focus our public attention. superstorm sandy may help the electorate focus in the few days that remain in the 2012 presidential campaign. our vote on tuesday will be for a disaster manager and chief taking charge of a country in an economic state of emergency, building a society that leaves all of us more prepared for disaster. at my table is ari melber, msnbc contributor. norry tan dan, kate dawson and david rodi, a reuters columnist and contributor for the atlantic. thank you all for being here. >> i want to start with you. the article, the piece you wrote was about the inequalities that have been revealed in the con te context of sandy. >> i am one of the privileged new yorkers. there has always been divisions in the city but this storm broug
? >> guest: i started after hurricane katrina. host mark what caused you to do this? >> guest: it was one of those times in my life when i didn't know what i was doing, and that this opportunity came up and i thought was perfect because i had no skills whatsoever. i did whatever they ask for in skilled people come in, they clean up than they do the serious work. so we did very basic labor. but it was necessary later. >> host: did you feel that your two weeks in new orleans was worthy? >> guest: guesstimate everywhere that i went from a question that. i said, what can you really do in two weeks? beyond the fact that yes, it is helpful to paint a house, but there was an intangible quality that it was good to be in new orleans nine months after hurricane katrina. people were so happy to have tourists back in people in the city. >> host: ken budd, what were you doing for a living prior to volunteering? >> guest: i was an editor and i was an editor in washington dc and i am still doing the same job. >> host: how did you get all that time off? could use your vacation time. >> guest: yes, i use
resources in a way that makes the networks run well, i think if you look back at the hurricane katrina recommendations, they were for voluntary, flexible framework. we did not disagree with the goal of the fcc to keep the networks running. that is in every carrier's best interest. it is how you go about doing that. for us, when you look a storm of this magnitude, is having the ability to react, move assets around. carriers have to put in thousands of feet of cables to drag cables of to the rooftops to power generators so that we could have cell sites working. >> let's go back to katrina in 2005. what investment have wireless companies done to improve the reliability? >> in every instance possible, putting in backup power. we put towers in on church steeples, on the side of buildings in major metropolitan areas. in closets within buildings. it becomes difficult in certain areas to have backup power. the carriers try to put in batteries were the cannot put in generators. where they can put in generators, the put in as much fuel as allowed. when you are working with building codes or resi
in a way that makes networks run well. i think if you look back at hurricane katrina and the recommendations, those recommendations were before the flexible framework. that is what we were pushing. we did not disagree with the goal to keep the networks running. of course we do. it is in the industry's best interest. it's how you go about doing this. for us, when you look at a storm of this magnitude, it is having the ability to react. carriers that had put in thousands of feet of power cable to drag cable up to the rooftop. so that we can have these sites work. >> host: what have carriers on to be more reliable in emergencies? >> guest: we put towers and unchurched peoples and on the side of buildings in major metropolitan areas and, you know, in closets within buildings. and it becomes difficult and areas to help that backup power. yes, they try to put in batteries were they can't put in generators. they put it in with as much fuel as they are allowed. but when you are working with building codes and zoning restrictions or environmental laws and imitations, you know,
the kind of decisions that had to be made during katrina and other events. instead of having a set standard of care, even if it's an altered or austere standard of care, what we want to have is good decision framework. until you are in the situation you can't determine what you would actually be doing and what resources are still available. >> do we have other questions from our audience? one final question and this is for our civilians. you got to see all kinds of cool stuff yesterday down at moffat's field. i want to see if there's one or two that stuck out. >> i think the c130 definitely blew me away, the fact it can transport 92 people, patients, was incredible. the other 1 that stands out is the mobile decon patient, that it can decontaminate a patient that was not able to stand. >> the team from the hospital that i was with and the other hospitals really looked at what were their hands on capabilities and some of the things that stood out the most is a portable oxygen generator that sits in the corner of the shock trauma platoon unit and doesn't have to be hooked up to our large l
a hurricane? we will show you how the victims of katrina traveled to new york to pay it forward from those suffering from sandy. details coming up on this monday november 12th and happy veteran's day we are observing it today good morning i am charley crowson. >> i am megan pringle. we will give outdetails about what's going on in downtown baltimore but if you headed that way you need to know how the weather will be. let's go over to meteorologist lynette charles. >> the parade is going to be good. the weather is going to be fine. and we are going to be mild as we go throughout the day. that's some good news this morning. we can see on maryland's most powerful radar not a whole lot to see. we are scanning the skies and dry but we have some showers and wet weather working its way in here later this evening and into tomorrow morning. right now, temperatures coming in at 46 degrees in hickory. 48 in ijamsville and you do need the coat as you step out. wind are on the light side and they will pick up as we go throughout the day out of the south at about 5 to 15 miles an hour. and also, we are
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
and hurricane katrina. -- a van hurricane katrina. that and more coming up in the next hour. linda bell. back to you. >> see you soon. 39 degrees in the nation's capital. >> we are off to a cold start this morning. >> temperature is a going to be pretty steady throughout much of the day. we are watching for the first snowflakes of the season later on this afternoon. adam caskey is on snowflake what. good morning. >> good morning. we are expecting snow flakes for the evening commute. the driving to work is just fine. you'll notice blustery conditions for the midday. the drive home -- a light rain, but mainly some light snow. road temperatures are between 37 and 41 degrees, not expecting much accumulation on the road. there -- it will not be heavy enough in the washington area. especially during the rush hour as more cars are driving, that keeps the road temperatures up. closer to baltimore, a different story. heavier snow, and some accumulation on the roadways. grassy services, a little trace. that much possible later today. that is about it. still a one out of hand with this storm. look at th
a will surpass those fom hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countlessse businesses hurt, others could see a boost.se erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed treesand damage to transportation networks, it could takandays-- if not weeks,i to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be thets most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the mt serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will lielyly surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they won't get back. insurance companies will have tu make big payouts, which will likely mean hiher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global predic
after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on individuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and in sufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- success convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema often got in the
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005. i'm not, again not comparing the gravity of the two event but i am comparing the immediate official response over the handling of these events. what i'm also noting is the distinct difference in the media coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. whether it will be an issue a few days from now. pat? >> it could be. what we are seeing, now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake pass, with the marathon and by the way, i have yet to see him in staten island. >> he has not been there yet. >> doesn't it tell you everything, the people you interviewed said. there is a political effort to run the clock out. with the media, like they've done on libya. just like they've hidden the truth about libya, hide the truth about this in the service of obama's campaign. let's get it straight. >> fox was the first camera crew to go to staten island to show this and others in the media have gone. you can't ignore it. >> there is a disconnect, the politician want to say everything is okay. rereality is this afternoon. what will they do, h
this before, during katrina, even with your protest, with president public we have problems do not get cocky, we have a handle on it, i am getting the same sense with this storm. i don't think anything approaching the magnitude of katrina thank good but the treatment of officials and the way they back slap each other when the problem is still very much at hand, that is similar. what do you thick of that? >>guest: that is similar and it is absolutely wrong. what i see based on my experience there must be a lost miscommunication going on between state, local, and federal officials. if that is the case and let me tell you why i think it is the case, if you have food distribution, warming centers, and fema centers where you can fine up for the relief housed in the same place, and family shuts that down and no one is communicating that to the victims and the disaster area someone is not communicating with someone and that is serious. >>neil: thank you for your insight, michael. the stuff gets coordinated and sometimes botched when everyone is not on the same page. michael brown was warning about
, this storm costs upwards of $50 billion, making it the second costliest storm after katrina. but atlantic city studios are allowed re-entry today. 95 sandy related deaths are reported in the u.s., including two brothers, ages 2 the and 4, and new york city staten island tt he centepicenter of the casu today. many are remaining powerless and they're not homeless, as well. and residents say the response is coming a bit too late. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help immediately. >> msnbc's richard lui is now in staten island with more for us. richard, good morning. >> thomas, very good morning to you. we're right here by the bay. several marinas in staten island and this corner has been hurt so much. if you lived in this area, you would have 30, 40-foot tall yachts sitting in your front yard. i was speaking with representative michael grim a little earlier. this is his district. and i asked him about the shelters. where are people going and what do they need? this is what he told me. >> they need
without power. >> new york gov. says hurricane sandy and katrina had a lot in common and none of it was good. superstar on sandy was worse in some ways compared to hurricane katrina. sandy did $42 billion worth of damage to new york. it costs more costly damage than katrina. >> in world news investigators had exhumed the palestinian leader to find out if he does poison by polonium. he died a decade ago after a sudden and severe illness. doctors from france, switzerland, and russia are going to take their own samples for independent analysis. authorities said high levels of the substance was found on araphats personal belongings. >> the fire that killed more than 100 textile workers by sabotage according to the bangladesh government. the worst ever industrial fire broke out on saturday and consumed in multistory factor. the interior minister said in a claccording to the investigation the fire was arson. >> coming up on the kron for a morning news we are following a developing story out of san francisco with the axis to and from treasure island on interstate 80 are closed due to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 309 (some duplicates have been removed)

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